click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN2 48
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
is good or bad about the current environment, we need to look not just at what we have lost or gamed compared to broadcast news but what we lost or gamed compared to the era of realism in the 19th century or the partisan press, in the late 18th century. or the progress receive era. so, we have really gone through these changes before, and the issue in front of us is not, is it good or bad? what's good about it, and what's bad, and how to maintain what is good and limit what is bad. >> host: let's go to the historical set of your book. what have we lost in this new era as opposed to the abc, nbc, cbs era. which is an era. >> guest: i think we lost significant things -- i should say lost -- you made the point that we have been talking about this for 20 years, we are style transitioning so those stations, those news networks still exist. but when we lived in an era, which we did in the '50s and ' 0s, and all the way up to the '90s where we as a society, wees a citizens, believed that if we watched the local news and then the national news, an hour or so period in the early evening, that
environment to another, what environment was the environment she was going to that caused the permit change? do you think that it was a culture thing from that environment? if so, can you elaborate more on the culture that she had -- that had changed her personality and what you think needs to be done? >> guest: yeah, you know, well, what happened was that when my father came here to the united states, my mother was left with us back in mexico, and she had to suffer, you know, the way a lot of wives suffer when they see their husbands go to another country, and there was a fear of being forgotten, abandoned, him finding another woman while he's gone. this was a fear that my mother had every single day about my father finding himself another woman here in the u.s., and forgetting about us and about her so she had to deal with this every single day, and when my father sent for her, it was such an amazing moment for her to feel wanted, to feel that her husband actually needed her by his side, and this is why she came because shemented to make sure that she could protect her marriage, that she
. for the environment. there's no question about that. fortunately in russia they don't have an environment. at least they have frequently behaviored as though they didn't have an environment. and certainly the oil industry has never meant particular -- been particularly concerned about the environment. i remember in the 1990s talking to the minister of the environmental science. he happened to be briefly also the ministry of agreology. i met him in the huge office. there were maps that showed radio active tam contamination. he was interesting. and id asked him about the environment. he said we don't have one. we can't afford one. it was very much the story of the 1990s. the signature of the russian hydrocarbon industry is very brief. it's absolutely conventional up to this point. and their investment in renewable and unconventionals is at this point. [inaudible] with one big exception in the nuclear power. they consider that to be a virtuous renewable. as for solar, well, the agency in charge of solar-power development is coordinated to the nuclear power agency which is tells you something. and so o
been studying how the radiation from fukushima has affected the environment. maybe you can give a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very s
environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of his decades of experience on capitol hill, he and i worked with congress to have included in map 21 the ability of the fta to have responsibility for transit safety. we were outlawed from doing it, and now we will have the authority to do it. this is a real breakthrough. and it really fits her safety agend
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyw
because of the environment offered. the first thing interurban competitiveness for community competitiveness is where do people want to be and he's moving cities. every city i work in, they want to attract engines of lunch premiership. 64% in favor they want to live, then they moved their look for a job. 77% say they want to live in america's urban cores. why? and massive cultural shift. when i was young, one out of 1219-year-olds opted out of getting their drivers license. now it's one out of four. the tv shows, chris weinberger asked me, what tv shows teach you watch growing up as an approaching 50? i watch rady bunch, partridge family, gilligan's island, all suburban tv shows. there is hawaii five o come was hawaii 50, streets of san francisco, crime television shows in the city. and of course there was lucille ball and the honeymooners for the city on this presence outside the light well of the kitchen dining. we took the kids -- what did the millennial screw up watching? friends, "seinfeld" and sex in the city. i grew up in the suburbs and they grew up in the suburbs, bu
is to foster an environment where sexual assault is not tolerated, condoned or ignored. we must have a climate of dignity and respect with where where a victim's report is taken seriously x they're provided resources. commanders or and leaders across the armed forces play an essential role in establishing this climate where victims supported, and they do not fear retaliation, where offenders know they will be found and held accountable and where bystanders are motivated to intervene. our troops take care of each other on the battlefield, the same ethos of care must extend to combating sexual assault. commanders are responsible for the good order and discipline of the forces under them. this is essential to military readiness and mission success. removing commanders from the administration of military justice would undercut their ability to establish good order and discipline in their units and undercut their authority especially in combat where the uniform code of military justice is most tested by the stresses of war. the department has undertaken a variety of initiatives to strengthen our ef
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
and less risky environments. and how to reward those local governments and governments that actually take large responsibilities for mitigating risk, with their business and investment. >> thank you. we have time for just one more question, although i've got probably three hours of questions in front of me. this next one combines three, four cards, questions from the audience, and comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. and this is about -- one part was what happened to poor people who can't afford to own land? and craig, you dealt with this, and margareta also. also, some of these vulnerable areas are also economics where factories and infrastructure, corporations are in these areas. and that's part of what drives people to be there. so there's also and industrial and economic aspect to this. in part of the challenge about helping or not helping is an ethical question, as well as a legal question. so i would like each of you to just address that briefly if you could. >> here's how i would frame it. i've been into me places where i call them the proverbial one c
, democracy and the new information environment. but it seems that for the last 20-30 years we half been debating the after broadcast news scenario. how do you assess it? >> guest: well, what we're trying to do in this book is put it into a little brit of historical context. so our basic argument is that over the last 20 years, there have been a number of changes, some slow, some more quick -- that are changing the way in which we think about where we get public affairs information from. and the three big changes we think are going on are the blurring of news and entertainment -- thank the daily show, although it's more than that. the blurring of producers and consumers, and the
begins to impact on the environment and on people and so that's when you get into agricultural drought, to hydrological drought and there's another type of drought sometimes referred to which is the socioeconomic drought which is kind of a supply and demand thing. so there gets to be a lot of confusion sometimes between what is and agricultural drought and a hydrologic drought. in the minds of the public but i would also say in the minds of some researchers and scientists. >> roger you you live right there in colorado. quite a few months out of the year so you are in a state with -- if you wanted to make a comment on that? >> from the standpoint of the state of colorado, one of the things as other states as don has mentioned is the idea of linking the drought plan to the other planning mechanisms that are there. the links between the drought plan and the water resources plan in many cases are very tenuous. one of the few states that was trying to make a link between the long-term use of the aquifer and its drought plan that don and others help develop is -- as well. to speak in terms o
a political movement. you moved toward the freer environment of the city. you moved from the south to the north. that is what most people did. in the process of doing that some of them became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism existed in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in a relatively freer environment they are able to create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. there is sncc and the clc and the others. who were the people who most move things? was a king? king? was it malcolm x? was at the death of medgar evers? was a stokely carmichael or john lewis? >> guest: all of them have different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain to students that parks made martin luther king possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give seat on that montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate well meaning baptist minister. is because of rosa parks th
in the political environment where each participant has multiple constituencies to which they're accountable in some fashion and paying attention to. and so you take the last few days, clearly in a state of play that involves positioning, and we can be critical, it's easy to be create -- critical about why that's kind of the reaction everybody always has in a labor dispute. why can't they just get in the room? they know the range of substantive outcome. it's not a secret, it's not hard to find, why can't they do it this afternoon? and similarly, observing events in the fiscal negotiations, everybody looks at it and say, well, why can't they get those four or five people around the table in the roosevelt room this afternoon and resolve it? the subsequent outline has always been there, it's been this in every private conversation with maul groups of members -- with small groups of members of congress from both sides. it's not elusive. the details can be complicated especially on issues like health care costs, but the broad outlines of a resolution of these problems are not hard or to define, a
growth a growth that is actually compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. now, what does that mean for us? i remind you that in 2013 the imf is certainly stronger, better equipped financially, has certainly refined some of its analytical tools. we will continue to strengthen our surveyance, peps on spillover -- especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training, technical assistance. in other words, we are not only serving the needs of a selected group of countries, but we serve the entire membership. and when you look at the map of the world and see where our teams are whether it's in capacity building, in technical assistance, in programs associated or not with financing, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and yet not completed reform of quota and governance which, as you know, includes three stages, two of which are completed, the third one not yet. and cer
their parents, their family and others and threatening them. and especially when you are in an environment of uncertainty, people say, well, international community might be leave, the security might deteriorate, so it's easier for these people to be intimidated and switch sides. also impersonation and using uniforms. i see a lot of people here that have been in kabul, and i've met them there. you can easily buy an afghan army uniform or police uniform on the market. you can even buy isaf uniforms if you're looking for it hard in kabul. so that's a part, but also copycat, mentally ill and unstable individuals like in here, sometimes you see what is an increase in the crime because people when they see something, they copy that. they think this is something cool or something acceptable. but, of course, rage and revenge, sometimes these soldiers are personally mistreated. but the last factor, of course s what they call jihad; thinking, of course, this is the right way of action. so so it's a complex phenomena, and i'm not going to go about how to deal with it. if needed, we can talk about it
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
enough that it would allow people to start raising capital in this environment while meanwhile it gives you experience and time to get them right? >> well, i think -- good to see you, professor. i think that question goes specifically to the larger question of the problem with principles-based rules which, obviously, at the sec we're not used to. we're very prescriptive in our rulemaking. but i'll point out to you, though, too when we try if you look at the proposal on general solicitation, when things are a little more principles-based and flexible what we get back from industry, from lawyers, from, you know, trade groups is, please, give us a safe harbor with three easy steps and a checklist so that we can insure ourselves against liability both from the sec and civilly. and so there is oftentimes a press to get that sort of prescriptive rulemaking. so i just, quite frankly, i'm skeptical it would work because i don't know if folks would take the ball and run with it if there was, you know, a principles-based approach here. i think instead the sec, we -- the commission -- need to just
is the political environment -- sorry. it can be hard to ignore, but were going to do it. another piece of the political environment, where we had the ability to fix the situation. we know to fix this. we needed a comprehensive dead deal that's big enough to stabilize the debt and we'll remember that. when you're trying to balance the budget. were not very. were not going to be there soon. you have to make sure that that's not faster than the economy and it's on a downward path and the problem is so big or too calm% year to look at every part of the budget. you have to look at defense spending. you have to clearly focused on health care costs, which go faster than the economy. we have to fix our social security system, which makes promises bigger than what we can pay out on the road. we have to raise revenues. we started down the path, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling tax system, which would you want to raise revenue, you could do in could do in the way bad for the economy hallway discussion helps increase competitiveness and modernizes our tax system. so we know what t
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
that is we create a regulatory environment, tax environment, and competitive regime here in this country that actually allows our businesses and workers to win in that global wheat competitive game at the moment. we have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this f
are saying and then move on to the serious discussion of tax reform and environment issues. so i see it in a sense the opposite way. i say let's get this done, the sequestration part in the debt ceiling in the next six weeks and then move on. those who are saying let's do it dribble by turbo, they are the ones who would be undermining the effort to sit down and have a serious discussion of tax reform. >> we've got about two minutes left. francine. >> the question about itemize deductions. what s-sierra thought of having a cab, that people can use it for whatever they want for mark h., whatever. >> i think the problem with the cap is that it has to seriously consequence, especially for charitable contributions. because a substantial portion of the charitable contributions come from the very wealthy. ii think the figure may be something like well over half comes from people with income over a million. it may be more than not. so the problem with the cap is do it have anything significant consequences for charitable contributions and perhaps for state and local taxes. so i think a batte
's because it is something we can do about, and the things we are doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction. soon after the earthquake in haiti was an earthquake in chile that was slightly on a level higher that killed less than 100 people, fewer than 100 people. we are a city of buildings and all these things and people have been forced to leave the countryside to come to the city to work and you have this dense population. we often discuss these things and how you version, the land, the fact we have to bring the trees for charcoal causes us to have these massive amount play and flooding. so these things are things we can do something about is a community. they get repeated more, that these other theories also talked about. >> host: and reading through "so spoke the earth," i was struck by the fact that so many writers here and in a sense to return. >> guest: i think so many of us come his children. it's different when you don't choose your migrations. we were like i've parents who fell like they had no choice but to leave. so you do
constrained environment you wouldn't make. >> if i may need to the secretary of the needy or the chief of naval operations is to get more convictions. my mission is to ensure a fair, effective and efficient military justice system and has said, the officers are responsible for the safety, the welfare and the discipline within their command the of difficult leadership decisions to make and they make those decisions case by case, day in and day out and they try to do what's right in each case, not what's easy and what's expedient and not what is a perception of what is expected of that. >> i want to thank you all of the panelists. this concludes the briefing. it's been extremely informative to all of us, and we appreciate not only your service but your participation today. we know that there are veterans out in the back of the audience and we also want to acknowledge their service and commitment and involvement in today's process as members of the audience. i also want to personally thank the commission staff that put this together and highlight who did a spectacular job of putting toget
for political instability perhaps has increased, amplified by the deteriorating economic environment that chavez will also bequeath to his successor. so what happens next? are there some scenarios that are more likely than others? what are the implications for vens venezuela and also the international community, and what is the chavez legacy for the region? we've assembled a top flight panel, each of the panelists having deep experience in and knowledge of venezuela. our first panel cyst is russell dallen -- panelist is russell dallen. was is a journalist through and through having worked for a firm of leading publications around the world, a keen observer of the issues. he's also an effective commentator, and his views are widely sought by the press and the markets. any of you of who have followed venezuela recently have probably seen his name pop up in some of the press articles. russ is a harry suspect truman scholar which is something i like to point out whenever i can. second is charles shapiro, formerly the u.s. ambassador to venezuela. charles recently which canned a very successful tenur
that the compromises are going to happen, too. host koza what do we do to sort of create the environment now that promotes compromise? is it possible -- is it just something that happens when a nation is creative and not any nation as continued? >> guest: there have been a lot of times in history. i think the constitution is a very good -- i call it in the book an engine of compromise that propels us towards compromise and one of the ways it does it is it is used to shut the whole thing down, but it's for any government a couple of people in congress can do it, a few people on the supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening than to let things happen. what drives compromise is the need to do something, the need to move forward to get we are always going to have a lot of political theater, and i love that. i come at this with an anguish major with a background in theater. i love the theatrical elements of our politics. i think it's fascinating. it's a dramatic, its common and tragic. it's just a wonderful bit of literature. in the and the founding generation had a c
: what do we do to create the sort of environment now that promotes compromise? is it just something that happens when a nation is created, not when a nation is continued? >> guest: i think there have been a lot of times in our history, i think the constitution is a good dish call it in the book an engine of compromise. it propels us towards compromise, and one way is by making it easy to shut the whole thing down. it takes very little to bring government to a grinding halt. a couple of people in congress can do it. a president can do it. a few people on the supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening than to make things happen, and what drives compromise is the need to do something. the need to move fur. i think that we have -- we always going to have a lot of political theater, and i love that. political -- i was an english major with a background in theater, and so i love the theatrical element of our politics. i think it's fascinating. i think it's dramatic, comic, tragic, a wonderful bit of literature. >> host: in the end, the founding generation had
to happen, too. >> host: what do we do to create the environment that promotes compromise? is it just something that happens in the nation is created, not when the nation's continued? >> guest: there's been a lot of times in our history. the constitution is an engine of compromise. he proposed the store is compromise. one of the ways it does this is by making it easy to shut the whole thing down. it takes little to bring government to a grinding halt. a couple people and congress can do it from a president can do it who appeared a few people on the supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening and make things happen. what drives compromise is the need to do something, they need to move forward and i think roh is going to have a lot of political theater. i come at this as an english major with a background in theater. so i love the theatrical elements of our politics. i think it's fascinating. it's dramatic, comic, tragic. it's a wonderful bit of literature. in the end, the founding generation had a country to create and they were going to give up almost every
use in the academic environment. as some of you know, three of our member publishers sued georgia state university because when georgia state moved its from printed course packs as materials for higher education courses to e-reserves, they made another change. they stopped paying a penny for anything put up on e-reserves no matter how, how long it was. and since 2006 not a penny has been paid. and because georgia state was, in the view of publishers, an outlier in that respect because we have understood and we think many people have understood that copyright is agnostic or same rules would apply whether we're talking print or digital, that's what led to this particular litigation. and i would say that there this -- we know there's all this vagueness and difficult any the deciding what is fair use. and you can run through four factors, but the bottom line, this is hard to figure out in many cases. but some cases are clearer than others. in the cases where large amounts of material are being used semester after semester after semester not paid for if any amount no matter how long th
extent. the uncertainty of it all fascinated me, as does my environment, just by nature. so the book ends up being very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth, and how over time, it changes. the same substance, stone, rock, water, wood, guess from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat, and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality, all the way. from childhood lower, immortal, to our elder years, where we become the archive, where we become the thing which holds so many people we have lost and is what survives. memory is what survives, and within that memory, the afterlife of so much. so, thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago i certainly did not expect i would end up here, or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think everything we have heard so far is a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never h
and one is to mr. dove -- when no one of your main arguments is that it's a good environment for negotiations of a similar situation, describing 2004. now, i want to know in light of all the -- that we have heard the government perceived by the taliban and the u.s. is pulling for the americans why would you say that the americans -- to talabani's in a situation -- [inaudible] could you please elaborate more and the other question is that in passing i heard something about india and iran. i would like to hear some more on that to see whether iran and india together or individually have any role in the play as you'll discuss. thank you very much. >> hi, katie from the department of state. you kind of reference the growth of ttp to the lack of support received by the pakistani civilian law-enforcement bodies. i wanted to see if you could kindly clarify whether the support you are looking for there was financial or domestic, political will and why do you think that support is provided to you? >> the gentleman behind. >> hi. i'm with the u.s. -- religious freedom. the role of reli
people working with the pimp will work to bring this person back if they can. they create an environment in which this person is very fearful and may return again to it. so what we know is that the internet has changed how this works. it's no longer somebody walking a street. it's advertised online. and backpage.com is one of the chief places where it happens. over the last couple of years, our police department has recovered over 25 young women that were advertised for sale b on backpage.com. and when you go, you have a chance and you go online, look up your city on backpage.com, and you will find b that escorts are being advertised in your city. now, you don't know whether those are over 18 or under 18, but i can tell you neither does back page. they will say they will work on it, but we asked them, and the u.s. conference of mayors asked them to require them to have in-person age verification with id for everyone they advertise as an escort, and they refused. now, we brought pressure on them, attorney generals across the country did, state leaders did, and backpage.com was a wholly ow
? >> guest: well, war is a completely amoral environment. all the rules are suspended. city blocks don't look the same nothing looks the same, especially in a weird place such as saigon was. it's a kind of free-for-all, especially when you're in such a foreign culture as the orient where none of the western rules apply, very few of them -- that coupled with the fact that women were the great surplus product of asia in those days. here you had all these gis and journalists and politicians and construction workers and aides workers and spooks and god knows what else just descending from the sky. most of them left their wives home. so what were they going to do? c-span: what impact did it have on the war? >> guest: i don't know. c-span: you write about the prostitutes and the bars. >> guest: of course, we're talking about people, which is the majority of those half million troops that were in the rear. guys that were beating the bushes every day and putting their lives on the line were not doing that full time. it goes with any war, i think. c-span: there are a bunch of letters in here from a fe
the aerial spraying, fumigation, we destroyed millions of acres of coca and rain forest environment. one of the most by a diverse countries and the world, literally scorching the years. but what are politicians don't talk about is that colombia is bigger than texas and california combined. the same is true bolivia and peru. a very large land masses. trying to eradicate is like trying to wage a war on dandelions in the united states. good luck. it's not possible. nonetheless, after 12 years of spraying and just merciless onslaught of eradication, 12 years ago 90 percent of cocaine in the united states originated from columbia. after a dozen years of intense drug war in colombia, today about 95 percent of u.s. cocaine originates from columbia. whereas less than 1 percent originally from bolivia. oblivion's actually have done much better in terms of eradication, interdiction of cocaine transiting through peru to brazil and argentina and other countries. also, they have captured and seized more of that than previous governments that were very subservient to u.s. interest. so by any objective
good for the environment were now being planted from fence row to fence row. so by 1999 the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. i'm sorry, 50% below 1996 levels, and soy was down 41%. and farmers were in really major economic distress. is so there was all sorts of pressure on congress to do something. food industry lobbying meant that the policymakers didn't go back and address these problems by reinstating some supply management provisions. instead, congress used taxpayer money to keep farmers afloat so they wouldn't be putting pressure if rural areas on -- in rural areas on their members of congress. so these emergency payments were instituted in 1998. the payments were made permanent in the 2002 farm bill, and that that's how the subsidy system was born. so who are the main beneficiaries of this kind of subsidy system? it's really the food and the meat industry and the grain traders who are the winners. deregulation saves them money by allowing them to pay farmers less for their crops than it costs to produce those crops. so it's not the subsidies themselves that are actua
a family in the safe and healthy environment. they face threats that once did not exist and we at the capitol have better make sure we are helping them. not hurting them in their efforts. [applause] together we make great strides in the last four years to improve arizona's competitive position. we face the hardest of times but sustain and strengthen state government through the downturn. per capita, arizona has the second number of state employees of all states. [applause] reformed our personnel system they will have a -- motivated by performance and accountable. [applause] we have passed meaningful reform to pass our education system and expand school choice. we limited regulation and enacted the a largest and most tax cut in the state history. unlike our friends in washington, d.c. [applause] and we even accomplished something novel and rare in politics. we kept our word. in 2010, we asked the people to increase their own taxes and promised them it would be temporary. that promise will be kept when proposition 100 sales taxes inpyres in may -- expires in may. [applause] not l
something very different. the individual if you would have taught that in a classroom environment adjust a discussion on -- [inaudible] that's very important dynamic there. >> game changer, shell gas, more regulation, barrier, culture. i want to talk about the here mowns. [laughter] mcken city is about the cutting age looking at not only global manufacturing trends but trends you're describing advanced industry. and innovation. how do you see it? >> i think very much is said at the beginning of the context claus. there's a shift doing on. i think we should start by saying too many of us lump manufacturing in to one big category. i think there are at least five categories. i won't bore with them. i think the tip is the advanced manufacturing which is more using big data. it's advanced material. it's nano technology. it's the combination of many of the things the innovation capabilities that this country is good at the cross functional capability. as you said, it's -- it's roughly around 11 to 12% of gdp. it's extremely important fly wheel. it accounts, football we think, a third of the u.
business and bald in their interest and they share the responsibility for how to invest in environments and how to report those local governments that actually take large responsibility for mitigating risk with their is this an investment. >> thank you. we have time just for one more question. i've got about three hours of questions and frenemy. this next one combined three or four cards, a question that came from the audience and it comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. this is about rebuilding and reallocating. what happens to poor people who can't afford to keep their homes and craig you dealt with this and margareta also. also some of the vulnerable areas are also economic centered where factories and infrastructure and corporations in areas and that is part of what drives people to be there. there is also an industrial economic aspect to this. part of the challenge about helping are not helping is an ethical question as well as a legal question. i would like each of you to address that briefly if you could. >> here is how i have been framing it. i have
for a vendor will be added. that's how you create an environment conducive to business also protecting citizens that will generate jobs. good work again. [applause] infrastructure, huge projects going on better on a beginning and i'll be talking about for the next two years i hope because of their progress. the first dimension with a smile as the bridge. [applause] we are moving forward with the new international train crossing. were written on the presidential permit, but it's a great opportunity and went to bed partners in canada that would not be possible. in particular senate to counsel general graham norton on a personal level, but also the country of canada for paying for this bridge. there's no taxpayer dollars involved. [applause] a huge accomplishment of something better than 40 years in the making, this is success have been known as the regional transit authority for southeastern michigan was a great effort of people working together in our teaching and not for all that hard work. [applause] i do have one particular announcement on that front. in announcing tonight to share. i get one
, but making some judgments. you're going to have a consensus which is more typical of the urban environment. you're going to go into -- let's get back to laura. let's go back to bring the communities in and around or, colorado, what i think is an important conversation because i think you will find there is probably more consensus around the country for what we refer to as responsible common-sense gun legislation that complement's. we will also find in republican areas a lot of support for after-school programs. you will find a lot of that. so i think part of the way you get good at continuing that conversation, i would say that you dispel the cultural barriers. is very different to your reaction in montana. >> came to the staff to go fishing. as kid to my branch manager who is an avid outdoorsman and quite a political, owns a lot of guns but primarily traditional bow hunter. i said, rham emmanuel is coming. oh, my god. i've got to go hide my guns. and we left about this. they're going to love your guns. >> the secret service. >> the secret service came and they spend a lot of time. they ca
typical of the urban environment that you're going to go into -- let's go back to aurora. those covering communities around aurora, colorado that it is an important conversation because they're sore consensus around the country above refer to its gun legislation that complements other things. it was defined in republican areas a lot of support for afterschool. the further away you get in continuing the conversation i would say you dispel a breakdown of cultural barriers because there are differences, your ranch in montana. >> on came to my ranch to go fishing and i said to my ranch manager, who is an avid outdoorsman and quite apolitical, owns a lot of guns, but primarily a traditional bow hunter. i say trade when it's coming at us to the has chief of staff ms. brittany secret service detail within. said i've got to go make a spirit i said no, they are going to let their guns. the secret service came and spent a lot of time and came back on other occasions to go fishiness in the secret service had my ranch manager bonded over it. >> respect do not and i don't want to use your ranch incom
on handguns and it's a far even less regulated environment. so we take you quickly to a few studies that we've done that i think shows some very consistent patterns here with firearms of four accountability measures and the diversion of guns to criminals. the first one we published in general were ripping talf in 2009. it was a study where we took the crime done to 54 cities that had done the comprehensive trade practices, had been in place in those cities. we looked at the state down laws that in addition to that we actually did a survey of state and local law enforcement agencies to see whether what practices they engaged in with respect to the oversight of licensed gun dealers and we did some regression and all this is where we control for a number of factors including and the proximity to the other states with weak gun laws. when you look at the state having strong done the other registrations by itself and actually did not affect the diversion of guns to criminals. it was only having vose laws in concert with a practice of in those agencies audit inspections and oversight of those deal
are very important to try to create this environment is most appropriate. that is what we are doing. there are potential risks and inflation was mentioned. we have obviously used an expansionary monetary policy and we have increased the amount of reserves that banks hold with the bad. there are some people that think that that will be inflationary. personally i don't see much evidence of that. inflation, as i mentioned, has been quite low. expectations remain anchored. private sector forecasters do not seek any inflation coming up, and in particular, we have, i believe, with all the tools that we need to undo our monetary policy stimulus and to take that away for inflation becomes a problem. so i do not believe that you can inflation is going to be a result of any of us. that being said i stability -- in terms of stability, it is well maintained. the other thing worth mentioning is financial ability. this is a difficult issue. the concern has been raised by keeping interest rates very low that the federal reserve induces people to take greater risks in their financial investments, a
a period of time begins to impact on the environment and on people. and so that's when you get into agricultural drought, hydrologic drought, and there's another type of drought sometimes referred to which is more socioeconomic drought, which is kind of a supply and demand thing, so there gets to be a lot of confusion sometimes between what is an agricultural drought and what is at hydrologic drought. in the minds of the public eye which is a also in the minds of some researchers and scientists speed roger, you live right there in colorado, quite a few months out of the year so you in a state that's got the perfect case study. i think he wanted to make a comment on that? >> so from the standpoint of the state of colorado, one of the things, and other states that don has mentioned them is the idea of linking the drought plan to the other planning mechanis mechanisms. the links between the drought plan and the water resources plan in many cases are very tenuous. one of the few states that's actually trying to make a link between long-term use of the aquifer and its drought plan,
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)